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Cat Toileting Problems?

By 11th June 2020 Animal Welfare, Thoughts

I received a plea for help with Luna, a 4-year old oriental cat. Her family had written, “A few years ago we re-homed a beautiful young lady (an oriental cat), we love her very much, but are having some challenges with her. We were hoping you could help!”

I said I thought I could and asked them to complete a booking form.

They further described, “Our cat started peeing and pooing outside the litter tray some months ago, but now we don’t think she uses them any more, she just goes around the house. With children in the house this is obviously distressing, but particularly now that we’re mostly all housebound. Also, I’m worried that my husband might try to re-home her or something. If you have a loving cat that behaves like that it is easier, but Luna runs away from us most of the time. We have had her for two and a half years, so this isn’t just her taking a bit of time to settle in with us.”

I communicated with Luna, connecting with her from her photograph, and Luna immediately shared the problem; she felt highly stressed. We talked, I asked her what she needed, I was understanding and caring about the situation and said I was going to let her family know her feelings and what she needed to feel relaxed and safe.

Luna shared a lot of information but the essence of it was to be accommodating to her needs:

  1. Quiet
  2. A safe place
  3. Freewill

Luna wanted them to calm her environment down and to allow her to make her own choices.

After sending some first impressions, her family reported, “Since you connected with her we feel that she has been more present with us, and more affectionate.”

That was only the beginning stage, I then shared Luna’s full communication and some simple suggestions based on Luna’s requests. Within days Luna’s guardian had written with a completely different story.

“Thank you so very much for this! We are really pleased that we went ahead because it has helped so much. The hands and expectations part especially hit home.

“We got Luna when we had an elderly Siamese who we adored. He was very much one of the family, and like to join in a lot – always on a knee, going for walks with us, and playing with the children in the garden. We got Luna because Orientals have the same personalities as Siamese’s (I know that each cat has their own personalities of course!), but Luna was so very different. We had expectations of her wanting lots of attention, but (maybe due to the fact she had been re-homed several times) she is a very different kind of cat.

“We are now all making the effort to back off and only stroke her when she asks for it. She also now has a bed on top of a bookcase (she used to sit up there sometimes), so she can go there any time, and I’ve told everyone not to go into the guest room, which is where she likes to sleep.

“Since these changes, she is now back using the litter trays, and I’m not aware of any further inappropriate toileting! She also comes to us for cuddles more often. She rolls around on the floor for cuddles, and then jumps into my arms for a bit, and then onto my shoulders where she likes to hang out.

It’s wonderful to see her so much happier.

“The changes have been hardest for the children. They grew up with our old Siamese cat who adored them, and let them do all sorts to him. We now have a one year old Siamese who is even more patient with all the kids attentions, so they’re not used to a cat who doesn’t want loads of interaction, but they are doing their best.

“It is also hard for Luna having two rowdy kids at home all the time, but these changes that we’ve put in place should really help her.

Thank you so much!!”

– Rachel, Luna’s guardian

 

“We would highly recommend using Pea’s services, it has made such a big difference to both Luna, and our whole family!”

– Rachel

 

If you’d like to send in an experience with your animal loved one, email pea@animalthoughts.com

With kindness and grace,

Pea Horsley

Animal Communicator

www.animalthoughts.com

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[pic. Luna]